• Isabella Romero

Parkinson's vs Huntington's: What Sets Them Apart?

If you didn't know, Parkinson's and Huntington's are both neurodegenerative diseases. People often confuse Parkinson's with Huntington's disease because both diseases affect movement. However, there are a few differences between the two. An example is their genetic makeup.

Huntington's disease is a genetic disorder caused by abnormal gene expression. Furthermore, Parkinson's is a condition caused by a lack of dopamine in the brain, resulting from a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Both Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases affect movement and lead to cognitive decline or dementia.

The following symptoms characterize Huntington's disease:

  • Uncontrollable movements

  • Unusual postures

  • Alterations in behavior, emotion, judgment, and cognition

  • Impairment of coordination

  • Slurred speech

  • Trouble swallowing and eating

Symptoms usually appear between 30 and 50 years of age.

Let's take a look at the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. They include

  • Tremor: Back and forth shaking of the body

  • Rigidity: Muscles that are rigid and resistant to movement, remaining tense and contracted

  • Bradykynesia: Slowing down of automatic and spontaneous movements, making it difficult to perform simple tasks and movements

  • Body instability: Loss of balance and changes in posture causing falls

Usually, Parkinson's disease develops at the age of 70, but it is also possible to develop it earlier.

Parkinson's patients can also experience the following secondary symptoms in addition to the primary symptoms

  • freezing sensation

  • speech and language difficulties

  • Changes in emotions

  • Constipation or urinary issues

  • Changes in cognitive abilities

  • Exhaustion

  • Inability to sleep

  • and dementia


Their causes primarily distinguish Huntington's disease and Parkinson's disease. A reminder that Huntington’s disease is caused by genetics. Parkinson's causes are more complex and involve both genetics and the environment.

In addition to their differences in symptoms, these neurodegenerative diseases have one thing in common: there is no cure. With a treatment plan that focuses on controlling symptoms, there is a way to have quality of life. In the near future, I hope that there will be a cure for both diseases with technological advances and scientific discoveries happening today.

Stay tuned for the next blog post by following The Bella Edit!

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